Library (Book Room)

From Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia

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'''Purpose of Room:''' Held Jefferson's libraries, the largest of which consisted of more than 6,000 books and was [[Library of Congress Sale|sold to Congress in 1815]] '''Purpose of Room:''' Held Jefferson's libraries, the largest of which consisted of more than 6,000 books and was [[Library of Congress Sale|sold to Congress in 1815]]
-'''Architectural features:''' Part of a "suite" of private rooms used by Jefferson, comprised of the [[Library (Book Room) |Library]], [[Southeast Piazza (Greenhouse)|the Greenhouse]], the [[Cabinet]], and Jefferson's [[Bedchamber|Bedroom]]; the plan based on an octagon, a favored architectural shape for Jefferson+'''Architectural features:''' Part of a "suite" of private rooms used by Jefferson, comprised of the Library, [[Southeast Piazza (Greenhouse)|the Greenhouse]], the [[Cabinet]], and Jefferson's [[Bedchamber|Bedroom]]; the plan based on an octagon, a favored architectural shape for Jefferson
'''Furnishings of Note:''' [[:Category:Books |Books]] (most of the books in Monticello today represent the same titles but not the original books Jefferson owned); book boxes stacked as bookshelves (today, reproductions are shown); an octagonal filing table, with drawers labeled for alphabetical filing; the easy chair which Jefferson, according to tradition, used while vice president; Jefferson's desk used for reading, writing, or drawing. '''Furnishings of Note:''' [[:Category:Books |Books]] (most of the books in Monticello today represent the same titles but not the original books Jefferson owned); book boxes stacked as bookshelves (today, reproductions are shown); an octagonal filing table, with drawers labeled for alphabetical filing; the easy chair which Jefferson, according to tradition, used while vice president; Jefferson's desk used for reading, writing, or drawing.
[[Category:Monticello (House)]] [[Category:Monticello (House)]]

Revision as of 15:06, 4 April 2007

View into the Bookroom from Jefferson's Cabinet (Study)
View into the Bookroom from Jefferson's Cabinet (Study)

Dimensions: 14' 10"x 15' 3" (with an annex 10' 10" x 10' 1"); ceiling 10' 0"

Order: Tuscan

Color: There is evidence that this space was originally wallpapered; today painted oyster white

Purpose of Room: Held Jefferson's libraries, the largest of which consisted of more than 6,000 books and was sold to Congress in 1815

Architectural features: Part of a "suite" of private rooms used by Jefferson, comprised of the Library, the Greenhouse, the Cabinet, and Jefferson's Bedroom; the plan based on an octagon, a favored architectural shape for Jefferson

Furnishings of Note: Books (most of the books in Monticello today represent the same titles but not the original books Jefferson owned); book boxes stacked as bookshelves (today, reproductions are shown); an octagonal filing table, with drawers labeled for alphabetical filing; the easy chair which Jefferson, according to tradition, used while vice president; Jefferson's desk used for reading, writing, or drawing.