Louisiana Purchase

From Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia

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'''The Louisiana Purchase''' (1803) was a land deal between the United States and France, which gave the U.S. about 827,000 square miles of land west of the Mississippi River for $15 million dollars. '''The Louisiana Purchase''' (1803) was a land deal between the United States and France, which gave the U.S. about 827,000 square miles of land west of the Mississippi River for $15 million dollars.
-"This little event, of France's possessing herself of Louisiana . is the embryo of a tornado which will burst on the countries on both sides of the Atlantic and involve in it's effects their highest destinies."+"This little event, of France's possessing herself of Louisiana . is the embryo of a tornado which will burst on the countries on both sides of the Atlantic and involve in it's effects their highest destinies."<ref [[Short Title List|''L & B'']], 10:318 </ref>
[[Image: LA_map.jpg|frame|1805 Map of Louisiana by Samuel Lewis; courtesy the Library of Congress]] [[Image: LA_map.jpg|frame|1805 Map of Louisiana by Samuel Lewis; courtesy the Library of Congress]]
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--Gaye Wilson, Monticello Research, March 2003 --Gaye Wilson, Monticello Research, March 2003
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 +== Footnotes ==
 +<references/>
== Further Reading == == Further Reading ==

Revision as of 10:12, 6 March 2007

The Louisiana Purchase (1803) was a land deal between the United States and France, which gave the U.S. about 827,000 square miles of land west of the Mississippi River for $15 million dollars.

"This little event, of France's possessing herself of Louisiana . is the embryo of a tornado which will burst on the countries on both sides of the Atlantic and involve in it's effects their highest destinies."Cite error 3; Invalid <ref> tag; invalid names, e.g. too many