Margaret Bayard Smith

From Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia

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-'''Margaret Bayard Smith''' (1778-1844) was a friend of [[Thomas Jefferson]] and chronicler of early life in Washington D.C. She met Jefferson through her husband, Samuel Harrison Smith, a Republican newspaperman and founder of the ''National Intelligencer.''+'''Margaret Bayard Smith''' (1778-1844) was a friend of [[Thomas Jefferson]] and chronicler of early life in [[Washington D.C.]] She met Jefferson through her husband, Samuel Harrison Smith, a Republican newspaperman and founder of the ''National Intelligencer.''
-The couple moved when the capitol moved from Philadelphia to Washington in 1800. Jefferson urged them to relocate and create the ''Intelligencer.'' Her books began to appear in the 1820s. As a member of high society, she wrote letters and notebooks on events that became the book [http://tjportal.monticello.org/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=896 ''The First Forty Years of Washington Society''] (1906). +The couple moved when the capitol moved from [[Philadelphia]] to [[Washington D.C.|Washington]] in 1800. Jefferson urged them to relocate and create the ''Intelligencer.'' Her books began to appear in the 1820s. As a member of high society, she wrote letters and notebooks on events that became the book [http://tjportal.monticello.org/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=896 ''The First Forty Years of Washington Society''] (1906).
She visited Jefferson at Monticello in August 1809. She visited Jefferson at Monticello in August 1809.

Revision as of 11:22, 15 October 2008

Margaret Bayard Smith (1778-1844) was a friend of Thomas Jefferson and chronicler of early life in Washington D.C. She met Jefferson through her husband, Samuel Harrison Smith, a Republican newspaperman and founder of the National Intelligencer.

The couple moved when the capitol moved from Philadelphia to Washington in 1800. Jefferson urged them to relocate and create the Intelligencer. Her books began to appear in the 1820s. As a member of high society, she wrote letters and notebooks on events that became the book The First Forty Years of Washington Society (1906).

She visited Jefferson at Monticello in August 1809.

Books Published

Further Sources