Margaret Bayard Smith

From Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia

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-'''Margaret Bayard Smith''' (1778-1844) was a friend of [[Thomas Jefferson]] and chronicler of early life in Washington D.C. She met Jefferson through her husband, Samuel Harrison Smith, a Republican newspaperman and founder of the ''National Intelligencer.''+'''Margaret Bayard Smith''' (1778-1844) was a friend of [[Thomas Jefferson]] and chronicler of early life in Washington, D.C. She met Jefferson through her husband, Samuel Harrison Smith, a Republican newspaperman and founder of the ''National Intelligencer.''
-The couple moved when the capitol moved from Philadelphia to Washington in 1800. Jefferson urged them to relocated and create the ''Intelligencer.'' Her books began to appear in the 1820s. As members of high society, she wrote letters and notebooks on the events that became the book [http://tjportal.monticello.org/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=896 ''The First Forty Years of Washington Society''] (1906). +Her recollections of Washington society life in the early nineteenth century constitute one of the major sources of information on Jefferson's social life as President. After Jefferson's retirement from political life, Smith visited him at Monticello. Her account of this visit is another fruitful source of information on Thomas Jefferson's daily life and family.<ref>[[Short Title List|Peterson, ''Visitors'']], 45-54.</ref>
-She visited Jefferson at Monticello in August 1809.+==Footnotes==
- +<references/>
-==Books Published==+
-*[http://tjportal.monticello.org/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=17136 ''A Winter in Washington, or Memoirs of the Seymour Family''] (Novel, 1824)+
-*''What is Gentility? A Moral Tale'' (1828)+
-*''Godey's Lady's Book''+
-*''National Intelligencer, the Southern Literary Messenger, and Peter Parley's Annual'' (1835-1837)+
-* [http://tjportal.monticello.org/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=896 ''First Forty Years of Washington Society''] (1906)+
==Further Sources== ==Further Sources==
-*Margaret Bayard Smith Papers. [http://www.loc.gov/ Library of Congress]+*Hunt, Gailliard, ed. [http://tjportal.monticello.org/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=896 ''The First Forty Years of Washington Society: Portrayed by the Family Letters of Mrs. Samuel Harrison Smith (Margaret Bayard) from the Collection of her Grandson, J. Henley Smith'']. New York: Scribner, 1906.
-*[http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/S?ammem/lhbcbbib:@field(TITLE+@od1(The+first+forty+years+of+Washington+society+))First Forty Years of Washington Society.] Full text at American Memory+*[http://lccn.loc.gov/mm82040436 Papers of Margaret Bayard Smith, 1789-1874]. Library of Congress.
 +*Smith, Margaret Bayard. [http://tjportal.monticello.org/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=17136 ''A Winter in Washington, or, Memoirs of the Seymour Family'']. New York: E. Bliss & E. White, 1824.
[[Category:People|Smith, Margaret Bayard]] [[Category:People|Smith, Margaret Bayard]]

Current revision

Margaret Bayard Smith (1778-1844) was a friend of Thomas Jefferson and chronicler of early life in Washington, D.C. She met Jefferson through her husband, Samuel Harrison Smith, a Republican newspaperman and founder of the National Intelligencer.

Her recollections of Washington society life in the early nineteenth century constitute one of the major sources of information on Jefferson's social life as President. After Jefferson's retirement from political life, Smith visited him at Monticello. Her account of this visit is another fruitful source of information on Thomas Jefferson's daily life and family.[1]

Footnotes

  1. Peterson, Visitors, 45-54.

Further Sources