Montpelier

From Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia

(Difference between revisions)
Revision as of 12:08, 3 November 2008 (edit)
Bcraig (Talk | contribs)

← Previous diff
Current revision (10:02, 5 June 2009) (edit) (undo)
Bcraig (Talk | contribs)
(Fix link)
 
(3 intermediate revisions not shown.)
Line 1: Line 1:
-[[Image:montpelier.jpg|thumb|right|frame|Montpelier, Madison's home.]]+[[Image:montpelier3.jpg|thumb|right|frame|Montpelier, Madison's home.]]
-'''Montpelier''', located in Orange County, Virginia, was the plantation home of [[James Madison]], fourth president of the United States. The original core of the main house was built around 1760 by President Madison’s father, James Madison, Sr.. In 1797 James Madison, Jr. and his wife Dolley moved to Montpelier and began making changes and building additions, with the advice of [[Thomas Jefferson]].<ref>Calder Loth, ed. ''The Virginia Landmarks Register'', fourth edition (Charlottesville: The University Press of Virginia, 1999), 366.</ref> Madison added a wing to the northeast end of the house, as well as a portico on the front.<ref>[http://www.montpelier.org/history/main_house.cfm Montpelier website].</ref> In 1809-1812, Madison made further additions to the house, again with the architectural advice of Jefferson and also with the help of two of Jefferson’s builders, [[James Dinsmore]] and [[John Neilson]].<ref>Richard Guy Wilson, ed. ''Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont'' (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), 130.</ref> +'''Montpelier''', located in Orange County, Virginia, was the plantation home of [[James Madison]], fourth president of the United States. The original core of the main house was built around 1760 by President Madison’s father, James Madison, Sr.. In 1797 James Madison, Jr. and his wife Dolley moved to Montpelier and began making changes and building additions, with the advice of [[Thomas Jefferson]].<ref>Calder Loth, ed. ''The Virginia Landmarks Register'', fourth edition (Charlottesville: The University Press of Virginia, 1999), 366.</ref> Madison added a wing to the northeast end of the house, as well as a portico on the front.<ref>[http://www.montpelier.org/ Montpelier website].</ref> In 1809-1812, Madison made further additions to the house, again with the architectural advice of Jefferson and also with the help of two of Jefferson’s builders, [[James Dinsmore]] and [[John Neilson]].<ref>Richard Guy Wilson, ed. ''Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont'' (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), 130.</ref>
In 1844, Dolley Madison sold the property. Renovations were made around 1860 and again around 1884 by subsequent owners.<ref>Montpelier website.</ref> In 1901, the property was purchased by William duPont, who made extensive renovations and changes to the house and property, including the construction of numerous outbuildings and additions to the main house that nearly doubled its size.<ref>Wilson, 130.</ref> In 1844, Dolley Madison sold the property. Renovations were made around 1860 and again around 1884 by subsequent owners.<ref>Montpelier website.</ref> In 1901, the property was purchased by William duPont, who made extensive renovations and changes to the house and property, including the construction of numerous outbuildings and additions to the main house that nearly doubled its size.<ref>Wilson, 130.</ref>

Current revision

Montpelier, Madison's home.
Montpelier, Madison's home.

Montpelier, located in Orange County, Virginia, was the plantation home of James Madison, fourth president of the United States. The original core of the main house was built around 1760 by President Madison’s father, James Madison, Sr.. In 1797 James Madison, Jr. and his wife Dolley moved to Montpelier and began making changes and building additions, with the advice of Thomas Jefferson.[1] Madison added a wing to the northeast end of the house, as well as a portico on the front.[2] In 1809-1812, Madison made further additions to the house, again with the architectural advice of Jefferson and also with the help of two of Jefferson’s builders, James Dinsmore and John Neilson.[3]

In 1844, Dolley Madison sold the property. Renovations were made around 1860 and again around 1884 by subsequent owners.[4] In 1901, the property was purchased by William duPont, who made extensive renovations and changes to the house and property, including the construction of numerous outbuildings and additions to the main house that nearly doubled its size.[5]

Today The National Trust for Historic Preservation manages the property, and efforts are under way to restore it to the condition it was in at the time of President Madison’s family. [6]

Jefferson's Visits

  • 1790 October 18. Philadelphia to Monticello.
  • 1791 September 11. Philadelphia to Monticello.
  • 1791 October 12. Monticello to Philadelphia.
  • 1792 July 20 & 21. Philadelphia to Monticello.
  • 1792 September 27. Monticello to Philadelphia.
  • 1793 September 24. Philadelphia to Monticello.
  • 1797 July 10. Philadelphia to Monticello.
  • 1797 December 5. Monticello to Philadelphia.
  • 1798 July 2. Philadelphia to Monticello.
  • 1798 December 18. Monticello to Philadelphia.
  • 1799 March 7. Philadelphia to Monticello.
  • 1801 April 3. Washington D.C. to Monticello.
  • 1801 April 26. Monticello to Washington D.C.
  • 1801 September 27. Monticello to Washington D.C.
  • 1802 May 27. Monticello to Washington D.C.
  • 1804 August 29 & 30. Monticello to Orange.
  • 1806 October 1. Monticello to Washington D.C.
  • 1807 September 30. Monticello to Washington D.C.
  • 1808 June 8. Monticello to Washington D.C.
  • 1808 September 28 & 29. Monticello to Washington D.C.
  • 1809 September 23. Monticello to Orange.
  • 1810 August 12. Monticello to Orange.
  • 1811 August 28. Monticello to Orange.
  • 1813 September 24 & 25. Monticello to Orange.
  • 1815 August 13. Monticello to Orange.
  • 1816 August 9. Monticello to Orange.
  • 1817 July 27. Monticello to Orange.
  • 1819 February 26. Monticello to Orange.
  • 1823 October 15. Monticello to Orange.

Footnotes

  1. Calder Loth, ed. The Virginia Landmarks Register, fourth edition (Charlottesville: The University Press of Virginia, 1999), 366.
  2. Montpelier website.
  3. Richard Guy Wilson, ed. Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), 130.
  4. Montpelier website.
  5. Wilson, 130.
  6. Montpelier website.

Further Sources